Uncategorized

Direct Action Gets Satisfaction: Anti-Homeless Security Patrols Suspended

We are glad to announce that Pacific Coast Security (PCS) has indefinitely terminated its participation in the anti-homeless Downtown Safety Team security initiative. This signals the suspension and hopefully the end of the security initiative. The Downtown Safety Team conducted nightly patrols throughout Olympia’s downtown core between the hours of 8PM-12AM, trespassing and sweeping homeless individuals found resting in alcoves and under awnings. The security scheme was funded through individual contracts with business owners, property managers and building owners, and coordinated and facilitated by the business front group, Olympia Downtown Alliance (ODA). Suspending the patrols is a crucial step in the wider movement to secure safer sleeping options for houseless residents in downtown Olympia.

PCS withdrew from the scheme soon after a protest disruption was staged that shut down the security patrol for the night on December 1st. This was the third time the nightly patrols were shut down through direct action. While yielding the most tangible effects, disruption was only one tactic deployed in a true diversity of tactics throughout this multi-month campaign. Demand delivery actions at contract-holding businesses/building owners, postering campaigns, informational leafleting and pamphletting at ODA-sponsored events, pickets and shutdowns of contract-holding businesses/building owners, street theater and phone zaps were all also utilized. This multifaceted strategy permitted community engagement to assume a range of forms and allowed participants to expend their energies and abilities in appropriate fashion.

While we recognize the immense progress made, we also expect that the Olympia Downtown Alliance and the downtown business class generally will maintain their commitment to vacating our houseless neighbors from the downtown core. We will remain vigilant to such efforts.

We would like to thank the numerous friends, supporters and community members who have collaborated in this campaign. This victory is testament to the power of collective struggle and direct action.

If comrades are reading this from other cities and are dealing with similar issues, get in touch! We would love to communicate and collaborate.

For more information on this campaign and on other recent conflicts regarding homelessness and public space in Olympia:

https://itsgoingdown.org/olympia-campaign-advances-through-direct-action-mutual-aid/

https://itsgoingdown.org/protest-zap-disrupt-olysol-campaign-expands-against-displacement/

https://itsgoingdown.org/campaign-to-end-anti-homeless-security-contracts-launched-by-olympia-solidarity-network/

https://itsgoingdown.org/the-struggle-for-the-artesian-well-in-olympia-wa/

 

Uncategorized

Pacific Coast Security Withdraws From Anti-Homeless Security Scheme

We are glad to announce that Pacific Coast Security (PCS) has withdrawn its participation from the anti-homeless Downtown Safety Team security initiative. This is a crucial step in the wider movement to secure safer sleeping options for houseless residents in downtown Olympia. Of course, we expect that the Olympia Downtown Alliance (ODA) will maintain its commitment to vacating our houseless neighbors from the downtown core. We will remain vigilant to such efforts. In the meantime, PCS withdrawal signals the suspension (and hopefully the end) of the Downtown Safety Team – a victory we couldn’t have won without the power of collective struggle and direct action.

Uncategorized

Responses to Frequently Asked Questions about OlySol’s Safe Sleep Campaign

 

 

“This drives people away from my downtown business!”

 

People who are homeless are not innately more dangerous or threatening than people who are housed. They simply don’t have a house to live in. When we begin to place blame on a specific demographic for any issue, including drops in sales, it is our obligation as community members to stop and think about whether we are enabling unfair prejudices about people who look a certain way. And if the problem is with an individual’s behavior, that should be addressed individually – we all deserve to be judged by our own actions and not by others’. Now, we know it can be uncomfortable for some folks to see people struggling with mental illness and drug addiction downtown, however until our system provides adequate help to those who need it (and it is woefully inadequate in those departments particularly), we don’t deserve to have the consequences of our failure swept under the rug. People have a tendency to not want to address problems until they’re right in front of our faces – displacing folks suffering from systemic issues within our society is just another way of kicking the can down the road. If we’re going to have a vibrant downtown, let’s build it on a foundation of justice and compassion and not at the expense of others.

 

Lets face the  facts: we are a poorer community now than we have been before. Wages are stagnant, not just here but all over the nation. Costs of living have skyrocketed, rents are at an all-time high, and the combined forces of online shopping and real estate speculation have sent a lot of dollars out of our community and into the bank accounts of large corporations. Faced with paychecks stretched thinner and thinner, spending habits have naturally changed. When you go downtown and see unhoused folks all over the streets, you are seeing what it looks like when a community is poor. It may feel uncomfortable to acknowledge that we are the ones that are struggling and not some outsiders looking for a handout, but it’s true. We are a community where many are now fighting to survive – and when we push houseless people out of downtown we’re simply keeping up appearances. These problems are systemic, and that means we will need the will and resolve to make big, fundamental changes to address them. If our current system creates suffering and poverty, we do not deserve the luxury of ignoring it, of pushing those it affects into the woods and the greenbelts – out of sight and out of mind. We will only have the resolve to change our system if we are forced to confront its consequences head-on.

 

We would also like to point out that lots of businesses are opening up downtown or have opened up recently. New construction is happening too. So there’s quite a few placing bets on being able to make money here. Not all downtown businesses deserve to survive, if they can’t show flexibility and follow the spending habits of those who live here, and the crowds of people moving in. And certainly they don’t deserve to literally change the demographics of who lives downtown to prop up old business models that worked 5, 10, or 20 years ago.

 

Ultimately, a crucial ethical question must be asked: Does the profitability of downtown businesses assume precedence over human survival? For individuals living on the streets, access to alcove space can be fundamental to protection from the elements. As temperatures drop and weather worsens it can become a literal question of life or death. Several folks die each year from exposure. If someone you cared about died in such a preventable way  would you be motivated to change things? Will we accept, like mass gun violence, that this is the new normal?

 

“What are business owners supposed to do when they are finding feces and needles outside their business every day?”

 

Instead of private security, what if we put our money into clean, safe 24/7 public restrooms in multiple places downtown and more downtown cleanup crews? More venues for needle exchange and disposal, and decriminalizing drug usage so that people aren’t forced to quickly dispose of rigs would also help with these issues and lessen the burden on individual business owners to keep their alcoves clean. Some business owners also choose to let individual houseless people who they have developed a personal relationship with sleep in their alcove, people who they know will be good stewards of the space. We strongly encourage getting to know your neighbors, housed and unhoused. There are groups in our community that are willing and able to help facilitate some of this relationship building.

 

“Why don’t you house them yourselves?”

 

Not everyone has the option to do that due to being a renter – and the majority of Olympia residents are renters. Some of us (OlySol)  have indeed provided housing to homeless individuals in our own homes. Usually this starts from forming personal relationships with folks on the street. For some business owners, a good middle ground has been to get to know some of their unhoused neighbors and to allow those folks who they think will be good stewards of the space to sleep there when the business is closed. If you work or live downtown, it’s important to get to know your neighbors – housed or unhoused. We hope that business owners downtown engage in this way and already have unhoused friends in mind that they may want to help out. And if you don’t have any, we would gently ask: Why? If houseless folks are a significant percentage of the human beings you see every day, we would challenge you to think about what may be getting in the way of developing personal relationships with some of them. If you’re already there, thank you.

 

But housing is also systemic problem, which requires more than just letting people camp in our backyards or sleep on our couches. Dealing with homelessness is a complex task which involves increasing the supply of affordable housing, public and cooperative housing, providing free/low-cost healthcare, sexual violence/abuse prevention, drug treatment, and many other things that individuals cannot provide on their own. This is why in addition to our personal relationships with members of the houseless community, OlySol members also work with numerous other local organizations that address homelessness using tactics ranging from political advocacy, to overnight shelters, to cooking community meals.

 

At the heart of this seems to be the thought – “Do what you want with your property, I’ll do what I want with mine.” This argument rings hollow to us because many of those very same private property advocates are also the ones who advocated for the 2008 ordinance in Olympia, which banned private property owners from hosting homeless encampments on their land. The original ordinance only allowed 2 camps total – 1 hosted by the county and 1 by a faith-based organization. Very recently our city council amended the ordinance to allow any number of camps, but private individuals still can’t host them – only the city, churches, and 501c3 nonprofits. If a kind-hearted person in your neighborhood wanted to host a homeless camp on their land, would you support it? Surely they have the same rights over their land as businesses do over their alcoves. Many people opposed to someone allowing another to camp on their property  might claim that it doesn’t just affect the property owner but also the people who live nearby – and so they should have a say in whether it happens. To this point, we would like to acknowledge that kicking people out of alcoves seriously also significantly affects those who live nearby- particularly those who are unhoused and live downtown, So, shouldn’t others also have a say in whether that happens? Fair play.

 

“Why do they have to sleep downtown in the sidewalk/doorways? Why not go to a shelter?”

 

For hundreds of homeless residents of Olympia and Thurston County, sleeping outside isn’t a choice. Shelter space is woefully inadequate. Last year’s Point-in-Time Count, counted 835 people experiencing homlessness in Thurston County (with the brunt of people either living in Olympia or neighboring cities like Lacey and Tumwater). The general rule of thumb is that, due to the limitations of PIT Counts, they tend to undercount actual numbers anywhere between 40-50%. Keeping this in mind, we know that the actual number of people experiencing homelessness in Thurston County is likely closer to 1600. Meanwhile, there are only about 200 shelter beds available during the warm season and about 250-300 beds in the colder months, depending on the availability of emergency shelter beds.

 

Furthermore, depending on the demographic people belong to, there are even more limited options for shelter. For instance, There is only one shelter for families with children, one shelter for youth, 1 shelter where couples without children can stay together, 1 shelter that allows for pets, and only 1 adult shelter that is not facilitated by a faith based organization (this is important to note as many people surviving outdoors have had negative and/or traumatic experiences with faith based groups).

 

There are also many people who are unable to stay in shelters due to the stress, emotional, and mental health triggers that are overwhelmingly present in shelter environments.  When one stays in a shelter, they are almost always sharing a small space with a significant number of people. This can look like sharing a single space/large room with anywhere from 20-60 other individuals, depending upon the shelter. Keeping in mind that typically all of the people are dealing with significant life crisis and often medical, mental health, and substance use related challenges- these environments can be incredibly difficult for people to function in healthily. For some people, particularly those who have experienced trauma in their lives, this type of living situation is just not doable.  

 

Some people also choose to avoid shelters is related to the easy spread of sickness, bed bugs, lice, and skin infections- like MERSA. Others, particularly those with work schedules, cannot abide by curfew requirements. For example, most shelters close their doors between 7-9PM, so people who work evening shifts cannot make it to shelters by the time they close.

 

When it comes down to it, even though surviving outside is far from easy, healthy, safe, or un-traumatic- for some people it is a more suitable alternative to living in a shelter. However, even with this, for most people it isn’t about a choice- it’s about the simple math and the simple fact that we have nowhere close to enough shelter beds to meet the need.

 

“Why are you threatening these small business owners?”

 

We feel that the people being threatened are the houseless people who are being driven away from the only safe sleeping locations that they have by private security hired by wealthy business owners. We are not threatening, we are promising that if these violent and selfish actions against houseless individuals do not stop, we will continue to take action.

 

We would disagree that we are threatening anyone. Certainly, we’ve given no indication that we intend to do anything violent or illegal. We consider their actions unjust. Movements that many of the older generations among us are proud to say they participated in, like those for civil rights and equality for LGBTQ+ people, were not just about having debates on Facebook. They also took action, similar to many of the actions we have taken (picketing, flyering, non-violent direct action).  And when they meant to take action, they didn’t send out schedules of marches, sit-ins, and demonstrations, to let people know what would happen if they didn’t change their ways. Characterizing the demands of all protest movements as “threats” is a dangerous escalation of rhetoric that we hope to discourage.

 

This campaign is counter-productive. Sleeping in alcoves and on sidewalks isn’t a solution to homelessness in our community.”

 

We view permitting people to sleep in alcoves and on sidewalks as a necessary but insufficient harm reduction measure. Access to more space, particularly space that is relatively shielded from rain exposure, can help mitigate the most harmful health consequences associated with homeless living conditions. As winter conditions intensify, freeing up more sleeping space becomes ever more urgent and a literal question of life or death for many on the streets.

 

It’s true that merely securing our demand for increased safe sleep options won’t solve the crisis of homelessness in Olympia. Nor would similar campaigns in other cities solve homelessness in those communities. Homelessness and housing instability (which effects large swaths of American society) are inherent to capitalism. Capitalism treats housing as any other commodity: a product to be bought and sold on the market for a profit, blind to human need. Ending homelessness and the housing crisis entails a multi-pronged approach to removing profit interests from the housing system and eventually guaranteeing housing as a human right to all those who want shelter. This approach can include advocating for affordable and public housing initiatives, community land trusts, rent-stabilization and eviction protection laws and increased shelter, mental health and substance abuse services.  It must also include grassroots organizing among tenants, struggling homeowners and homeless people to directly confront the greed of landlords, banks and governments to ensure stable housing conditions (something OlySol has done in the past). OlySol members, inside and outside OlySol, in Olympia and in other cities, have contributed to an array of housing justice movements that seek to halt displacement and eliminate the very roots of homelessness. These include efforts to fight foreclosures, pass ballot initiatives to increase affordable housing options and force landlords to make necessary repairs.

 

Ending homelessness will always necessarily involve more short-term harm reduction organizing coinciding with more systemic interventions in the housing system. Thus, while this campaign doesn’t ultimately offer a solution to homelessness, it is still a productive and worthwhile undertaking.

 

“Why not pick up trash and feces yourselves? Why not engage in more constructive work?”

 

Many OlySol members are involved in a number of community-based initiatives to deal with the public sanitation crisis homelessness often entails. This includes work around garbage collection, needle exchange and the distribution of sanitary supplies. Members have also organized in other organizational capacities for increased public sanitation services, namely 24/7 public bathroom access throughout downtown.

 

Moreover, OlySol is an official collaborator of the Mutual Aid Mondays project, a food, clothing, medical and hygiene supply provisioning event that occurs every Monday evening at the camps adjacent to the transit center. While much of OlySol’s work is direct action-oriented, we also believe mutual aid must be central to our strategy. Mutual aid is crucial when the state and market fails to meet basic human needs and can be an important way to forge new personal and political relationships.

Uncategorized

Mutual Aid Mondays

Every Monday for the past two months, members of  Just Housing, Olympia Assembly, Oly Sol, Olympia Community Medics, Olympia Industrial Workers of the World and residents of the downtown houseless community have been coming together to share hot food, coffee, winter clothing, medicine, hygiene and other survival supplies for the cold and wet months ahead.

A hot meal, dry clothing and conversation can be the difference between life and death for someone living without adequate shelter, in poverty, burdened with illness or depression. We are not here to do charity work, but to build community and organize around our shared struggles as neighbors, comrades and friends.

Anyone is welcome to join. We meet downtown at Franklin and State, 7pm every Monday. Fight the Power, Serve the People!

For inquiries, contact olysolidarity@gmail.com

Uncategorized

Protest, Zap, Disrupt! Campaign Against Displacement Expands

Olympia Solidarity Network (OlySol) has moved forward with its campaign against anti-homeless security contracts held between downtown Olympia businesses and the private security firm, Pacific Coast Security (PCS). A couple dozen business owners, property managers and building owners contract with Pacific Coast Security in a scheme facilitated by “business advocacy” group, Olympia Downtown Alliance (ODA), called the “Downtown Safety Team.” PCS guards hired for this scheme perform nightly patrols from 8PM to 12AM and trespass and displace people sleeping in the alcoves or other parts of property owned by participating parties.  On September 5th, 30 OlySol members and supporters delivered demand letters to two businesses that contract with PCS, Harlequin Productions and Cooper Realty/Orca Construction, demanding contract cancellation. Letters were also issued to other participating businesses, property managers and building owners, noting that if their contracts aren’t cancelled they too could be subject to a campaign.

When after 14 days neither Harlequin Productions or Cooper Realty/Orca Construction nor any other participating party issued contract cancellation OlySol immediately resumed action. In the last couple weeks OlySol has done the following:

 

September 19th: Harlequin and Cooper Realty/Orca Construction Postering

 

Upon 14 days following the demand deliveries, OlySol organized a poster campaign targeting the two businesses. Posters discouraging consumers from patronizing the enterprises were placed throughout downtown and adjacent to the offices of Cooper Realty/Orca Construction.

 

September 29th: Street Theater and Leafleting at Harlequin’s Annual Gala

 

Harlequin Production’s annual gala is the theatre’s largest fundraising event. This year, the gala was visited by ten OlySol members and supporters. Leaflets were distributed to the gala’s attendees while a number of others staged an improvised and humorous skit portraying PCS guards sweeping people sleeping on the ground. The action was concluded with an anti-PCS song sung collectively by the group, eliciting the slamming of the propped open front door by an apparent gala organizer.

 

October 2nd: Cooper Realty/Orca Construction Phone Zap

 

Thanks to promotion from It’s Going Down and on social media, OlySol held a successful phone zap of Cooper Realty/Orca Construction, flooding the business’ phone lines for the day. Although less flashy, phone zaps are easily executed and can yield tangible effects by disrupting business-as-usual for targets.

 

October 4th: Picket at Harlequin Productions

Over 40 people dressed in a diverse array of costumes and otherwise funky attire staged a festive picket outside of Harlequin Productions. The picket occurred 30 minutes before the opening of a new show at the theatre. Demonstrators distributed pamphlets and leaflets about the security contracts, banged on drums and shouted chants. Some chants included, “Cancel the contract, or we’ll be back!” and “Stop the sweeps, stop the sweeps, PCS off our streets!”

 

October 4th: Mass Copwatch and Disruption of Pacific Coast Security’s Nightly Patrol

 

Immediately following the picket, the demonstration moved to confront PCS guards beginning their nightly patrol shift at 8PM in a comical and playful but highly disruptive direct action. Upon notice of the impending demonstration, PCS guards did an about-face and started to return to the office of the Olympia Downtown Alliance, where PCS guards take breaks and begin and end shifts. Demonstrators than marched around the block where ODA is headquartered before settling on the sidewalks adjacent to the two entrances of the building, occasionally taking notice of the two security guards lurking in the hallway. Around 10PM, with the protest dwindling, officers from Olympia Police Department and Thurston County Sheriff’s Department, including some clad in riot gear advanced toward the protest.  PCS guards were then escorted to police vehicles and driven away. The protest dispersed, satisfied with preventing PCS from performing nightly patrols for nearly 2 hours.

 

More Information:

 

Pacific Coast Security is headquartered in Tacoma, WA and provides services throughout the south Puget Sound region. PCS (like other private security forces) is distinct from but complementary to state-operated police departments. PCS guards have the power to trespass people sleeping or sitting in alcoves and alleyways but must call upon Olympia Police Department (OPD) to perform arrests of trespassed individuals. The recent increase in contracts between downtown businesses and Pacific Coast Security has been encouraged and facilitated by the Olympia Downtown Alliance (ODA). ODA is a self-described “business advocacy” organization whose actions constitute a significant political force for gentrification in the city. While ODA doesn’t directly financially subsidize contracts, the group provides technical assistance and other conveniences that incentivize businesses to contract with PCS. Disturbingly, nightly patrols by PCS guards have been effective in driving many homeless people out of the core of downtown and into encampments on the periphery of downtown, or further into the city’s eastern and western neighborhoods. Out of downtown, homeless residents have a harder time accessing necessary services.

The PCS contracts highlight the current contradictory trends regarding responses to homelessness in Olympia. On the one hand, as Olympia gentrifies there is strong pressure from the city government and business owners to displace and criminalize the hundreds of homeless people who call Olympia home. On the other hand,  persistent direct action and mutual aid organizing from homeless solidarity activists has forced the city government to concede on some issues. Recently, the city council passed resolutions to open limited legal camping sites and allocate funding for a day center and other services. As minimal as these reforms are, they have provoked outrage among Olympia’s local ruling class, hence business owners increasingly utilizing PCS security services. More recently, the city government has taken more repressive and criminalizing measures against the downtown homeless population. Firstly, attempts were made to evict three downtown encampments, all of which were indefinitely stayed due to the potential legal implications of the Martin V. City of Boise case of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Secondly, the city continues to enforce a variety of ordinances to displace people sitting or lying on sidewalks, sleeping in tents and living in vehicles. Tensions flared to new heights when Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation Director Paul Simmons issued the unilateral decision to shutter the Artesian Commons, a local park and important home and hang-out for street youth in particular. These measures, but especially the park closure, has sparked marches, sit-ins, new mutual aid projects and a large and festive direct action that successfully temporarily re-opened the Artesian Commons, culminating in street confrontations and multiple arrests.

 

For more on recent resistance efforts, we suggest the following articles: https://itsgoingdown.org/olympia-anger-grows-as-city-comes-down-on-homeless/

https://itsgoingdown.org/olympia-wa-autonomous-crowd-reopens-the-artesian-commons-police-respond-with-force/

https://itsgoingdown.org/the-struggle-for-the-artesian-well-in-olympia-wa/

 

As conflicts over homelessness and access to public space heighten, OlySol is well equipped to intervene in the broader homeless solidarity movement in Olympia. With a track record of successfully combating stolen deposits, wage theft and refused repairs, a consistent capacity to mobilize community members, and politicize working-class people in the process, OlySol can help advance a viable, direct action-based strategic approach within the movement.

 

pcs, Uncategorized

Campaign to End Anti-Homeless Security Contracts Launched by Olympia Solidarity Network

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Olympia Solidarity Network (OlySol) has initiated a campaign against downtown Olympia businesses that contract with the private security contract firm, Pacific Coast Security (PCS). PCS operates nightly security patrol services to contracting businesses in an effort to displace and criminalize homeless people using alcoves and alleys as living space. Approximately 30 OlySol members and supporters delivered demand letters to the offices of both Harlequin Productions and Orca Construction/Cooper Realty. The demand letters outlined the unethical nature of the criminalization of homelessness that PCS engages in and calls for an immediate cancellation of all PCS contracts. The demand letter specified that if these businesses do not cancel their contracts within 14 days, further action will be taken. Additionally, approximately two dozen other downtown Olympia businesses that are known to contract with PCS, but aren’t currently being directly targeted in a campaign, were also delivered letters. These letters explained that OlySol was targeting two neighboring businesses and that if other businesses in downtown don’t stop contracting with PCS, any one could be the subject of a new direct action campaign.

Pacific Coast Security is headquartered in Tacoma, WA and provides services throughout the south Puget Sound region. PCS (like other private security forces) is distinct from but complementary to state-operated police departments. PCS guards have the power to trespass people sleeping or sitting in alcoves and alleyways but must call upon Olympia Police Department (OPD) to perform arrests of trespassed individuals. The recent increase in contracts between downtown businesses and Pacific Coast Security has been encouraged and facilitated by the Olympia Downtown Alliance (ODA). ODA is a self-described “business advocacy” organization whose actions constitute a significant political force for gentrification in the city. While ODA doesn’t directly financially subsidize contracts, the group provides technical assistance and other conveniences that incentivize businesses to contract with PCS. Disturbingly, nightly patrols by PCS guards have been effective in driving many homeless people out of the core of downtown and into encampments on the periphery of downtown, or further into the city’s eastern and western neighborhoods. Out of downtown, homeless residents have a harder time accessing necessary services.

The PCS contracts highlight the current contradictory trends regarding responses to homelessness in Olympia. On the one hand, as Olympia gentrifies there is strong pressure from the city government and business owners to displace and criminalize the hundreds of homeless people who call Olympia home. On the other hand, persistent direct action and mutual aid organizing from homeless solidarity activists has forced the city government to concede on some issues. Recently, a relatively progressive city council passed resolutions to open limited legal camping sites and allocate funding for a day center and other services. As minimal as these reforms are, they have provoked outrage among Olympia’s local ruling class, hence business owners increasingly utilizing PCS security services. Moreover, the city government is experiencing internal conflict on the question of homelessness. Many city council members are generally supporting more progressive legislation, while the unelected city manager and other city bureaucrats maintain highly reactionary positions and implement repressive and criminalizing measures. This internal political conflict came to a fore recently when Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation Director Paul Simmons made the unilateral decision to shutter the Artesian Commons, a local park and important home and hang-out for street youth in particular. Read more about the park closure decision and resistance to it here: https://itsgoingdown.org/olympia-anger-grows-as-city-comes…/. Finally, these tensions are exacerbated by increasing homelessness in the region, fueled by skyrocketing housing costs, low wages and an erosion of social services.

As conflicts over homelessness and access to public space heighten, OlySol is well equipped to intervene in the broader homeless solidarity movement in Olympia. With a track record of successfully combating stolen deposits, wage theft and refused repairs, a consistent capacity to mobilize community members, and politicize working-class people in the process, OlySol can help advance a viable, direct action-based strategic approach within the movement.

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The Olympia Solidarity Network (OlySol) is a volunteer network that uses direct action to combat landlord and employer greed and abuse. We collaborate and organize campaigns with tenants and workers who have specific grievances against their former or current landlords and employers, such as stolen wages or denied deposits. By deploying direct action tactics (be it a picket, poster campaign or office occupation) against abusive landlords and bosses, OlySol can help win relatively immediate housing and workplace improvements for tenants and workers.

If you would like to keep updated on the Pacific Coast Security campaign, get involved in OlySol or want to learn more, please contact us!

Website: olyassembly.org/olysol
Facebook: facebook.com/OlySolNet
Email: olysolidarity@gmail.com